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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 85-92

Filariasis: A major potential imported parasitic disease in Najran District of Saudi Arabia


1 Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Najran University, Najran, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Public Health, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Albaha University, Albaha, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Najran University, Najran, Saudi Arabia; Department of Animal Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt
4 Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia
5 Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jazan University, Gizan, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Ahmed Saif
Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Najran University, Najran
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/KKUJHS.KKUJHS_46_21

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Introduction: Expatriate workers usually contribute to the origination of some infectious diseases in the countries they reside. The aim of this study was to identify and analyze available information on filariasis imported into Najran, Saudi Arabia, by expatriate workers. Methodology: Serum (n = 497) were acquired from expatriate workers of both genders from different nationalities and various ages and also from randomly chosen parts and at different time periods of Najran. The serum samples were stored in a deep freezer at a temperature of − 65°C until utilized for the serological diagnosis of filariasis by using filariasis immunoglobulin G/immunoglobulin M (IgG/IgM) combo rapid test and human filariasis antibody (IgG4) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Based on IgG/IgM rapid test, the prevalence of filariasis IgG was 3.8% (19 out of 497), whereas IgG4 ELISA showed that the prevalence of filariasis was 10.9% (10 out of 92). The highest prevalence of filariasis occurred in Indian workers, in adulthood (30–49 years), and in male workers. There was no significant agreement in results between IgG/IgM rapid test and ELISA. The percentage specificity of IgG/IgM rapid test, relative to filariasis IgG4 ELISA was 80.5%. Conclusions: The possibility of health hazard due to imported filariasis and preeminently the initiation of a novel carrier focal point of the disease are likely to relied upon the abundance of carriers of microfilaria and the density of vector mosquitoes who feed on the carriers. Furthermore, the results of this study underscore the need for screening and therapeutic strategies that guarantee the control and prevention of parasitic infectious diseases.


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