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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 70-77

Residency and fellowship training programs in the United States of America: A cross-sectional survey of Saudi medical graduates


1 Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2 Department of Neurosurgery, King Fahad Hospital of the University, Imam Abdulrahman bin Faisal University, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
3 Vice Rector at Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Health Affairs and Education Matters Department, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
4 Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Hanan Jaber Al-Gethami
Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON
Canada
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/KKUJHS.KKUJHS_23_21

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Background: International medical graduates (IMGs) who study abroad face multiple challenges and more significant discrimination compared to that experienced by other graduates. These obstacles take different forms and occur in multiple stages. Furthermore, adaptation to a new culture causes several challenges for them, affecting their training and patient care. Objectives: This study was done to evaluate the personal experiences of Saudi IMGs and to describe the challenges they encounter during their residency and fellowship training programs in the United States of America. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted online in 2013. Participants included 230 Saudi IMGs enrolled in residency or fellowship training programs in the United States of America. Results: The majority of the respondents were males and strongly disagreed that lack of English language proficiency was a barrier to learning. High disagreement on discriminatory criticism was most common in postgraduate year 5 (R5) and higher levels (44.8%). Most participants reported positive experiences involving the learning environment. Moreover, some participants reported that they did not find it difficult to perform their religious activities. Total 43.4% of the participants reported equality of treatment regarding administrative responsibilities. However, subgroup analysis showed that women's experiences were less favorable than those observed in the male population. Conclusions: Results suggested that Saudi IMGs had an overall positive experience and faced minor barriers while studying in the United States of America. However, subgroup analysis showed that women's experiences were less positive relative to men.


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