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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 46-51

Nomophobia associated with depression, anxiety, and stress in nursing students: A cross-sectional study in college of nursing, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia


1 Department of Nursing, College of Nursing, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, National Guard Health Affairs, King Abdulaziz Medical City; King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Nursing, College of Nursing, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, National Guard Health Affairs, King Abdulaziz Medical City; College of Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, King Saud bin Abdul Aziz University for Health Sciences, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Hawazen Rawas
Nursing Department, College of Nursing, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, P.O.Box 9515 Jeddah 21423
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/KKUJHS.KKUJHS_31_20

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Background: Nomophobia is described as the fear of losing contact with mobile phones. It is widely reported in nursing students who may also experience depression, anxiety, and stress. Little is known about the relationship of nomophobia with depression, anxiety, and stress. Objectives: This study was designed to (a) assess nomophobia in nursing students and to (b) evaluate the impact of depression, anxiety, and stress on nomophobia in nursing students. Material and Methods: The study was carried out in College of Nursing, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Study sample (n = 311) comprised students enrolled in all levels of bachelor of science in Nursing degree. A self-administered survey was conducted using the Nomophobia Questionnaire tool for nomophobia and DASS-21 for depression, anxiety, and stress. Results: Undergraduate nursing students were presented with mild (12.9%), moderate (46.9%), and severe (40.2%) nomophobia. The highest mean score yielded for nomophobia Factor 1 – not being able to communicate (4.74 ± 1.77), whereas the lowest score was noted for nomophobia Factor 2 – losing connectedness (4.07 ± 1.96). A significant positive correlation was noted between depression and Factor 4 – giving up convenience of nomophobia (r = 0.11, P < 0.05). A high prevalence of nomophobia was noted. Severity of depression contributed positively to severity of nomophobia. Conclusion: Findings indicate the coexistence of depression, anxiety, or stress in nomophobia.


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